RV7 max crosswind component

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RV7 max crosswind component

Unread post by Technocrat » Mon Jul 16, 2018 5:15 pm

I had a close call last week when taking off in a (gusting) crosswind from my right - as the aircraft was picking up speed the tail slipped away to the left and I managed to get airborne just before running off the runway (right into the wind); left me with a red face. When checking my CAA approved POH afterwards to see what the RV7 taildragger's max demonstrated crosswind component is, I was surprised to find that it is not mentioned anyware - another red face; I should have known that.


Does anyone have it available for me please?

Thanks
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Re: RV7 max crosswind component

Unread post by ACE MAN » Mon Jul 16, 2018 6:02 pm

The CAA approved manual would have been written by the builder. Generally a note of the max demonstrated crosswind is mentioned (or not) of around 12kts (My written manual that is approved does not mention that). A limit is not normal mentioned and I can tell you that the RV7/8 can handle a considerable cross wind more than that. The "stick" at RCA will demonstrate double that for you :). The aircraft limit is normally limited by the pilot - i would strongly suggest 12kts but 15 is just as easy.
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Re: RV7 max crosswind component

Unread post by Technocrat » Tue Jul 17, 2018 4:42 pm

ACE MAN wrote:
Mon Jul 16, 2018 6:02 pm
The CAA approved manual would have been written by the builder. Generally a note of the max demonstrated crosswind is mentioned (or not) of around 12kts (My written manual that is approved does not mention that). A limit is not normal mentioned and I can tell you that the RV7/8 can handle a considerable cross wind more than that. The "stick" at RCA will demonstrate double that for you :). The aircraft limit is normally limited by the pilot - i would strongly suggest 12kts but 15 is just as easy.
Thanks Ace Man. I spoke to another Avcommer and his procedure is that when he takes off with a strong cross wind, he puts brakes ON, go to full power and then release the brakes with the idea to get as much air flow over the rudder as possible before the aircraft starts moving.

What is your modus operandi in such a scenario?

Lourens
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Re: RV7 max crosswind component

Unread post by hugo_visser » Tue Jul 17, 2018 5:17 pm

I would put the aircraft back in the hangar and have a beer.

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Re: RV7 max crosswind component

Unread post by ACE MAN » Tue Jul 17, 2018 8:52 pm

Technocrat wrote:
Tue Jul 17, 2018 4:42 pm
ACE MAN wrote:
Mon Jul 16, 2018 6:02 pm
The CAA approved manual would have been written by the builder. Generally a note of the max demonstrated crosswind is mentioned (or not) of around 12kts (My written manual that is approved does not mention that). A limit is not normal mentioned and I can tell you that the RV7/8 can handle a considerable cross wind more than that. The "stick" at RCA will demonstrate double that for you :). The aircraft limit is normally limited by the pilot - i would strongly suggest 12kts but 15 is just as easy.
Thanks Ace Man. I spoke to another Avcommer and his procedure is that when he takes off with a strong cross wind, he puts brakes ON, go to full power and then release the brakes with the idea to get as much air flow over the rudder as possible before the aircraft starts moving.

What is your modus operandi in such a scenario?

Lourens
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Re: RV7 max crosswind component

Unread post by RudiGreyling » Thu Sep 20, 2018 8:07 am

Technocrat wrote:
Tue Jul 17, 2018 4:42 pm
ACE MAN wrote:
Mon Jul 16, 2018 6:02 pm
The CAA approved manual would have been written by the builder. Generally a note of the max demonstrated crosswind is mentioned (or not) of around 12kts (My written manual that is approved does not mention that). A limit is not normal mentioned and I can tell you that the RV7/8 can handle a considerable cross wind more than that. The "stick" at RCA will demonstrate double that for you :). The aircraft limit is normally limited by the pilot - i would strongly suggest 12kts but 15 is just as easy.
Thanks Ace Man. I spoke to another Avcommer and his procedure is that when he takes off with a strong cross wind, he puts brakes ON, go to full power and then release the brakes with the idea to get as much air flow over the rudder as possible before the aircraft starts moving.

What is your modus operandi in such a scenario?

Lourens
Hi Lourens, I'll give you my 2c...don't do the brake max power crosswind take-off scenario, you looking for more trouble....

Determining max crosswind during take off is difficult, rather put the airplane away if in doubt, you are on the ground not committed to flight so wait. If you absolutely still need to take off, then bring the power slow and smoothly and accelerate smoothly, and keep the tail wheel down on the ground (to help with tail stability) as long as possible to get as much groundspeed / airspeed / airflow over the rudder for additional rudder effectiveness before lifting the tail slightly of the ground for take off.

Determining max crosswind during landing is fairly easy, you are now already committed to flight, few airports have towers to tell you the crosswind component, so you have to make a plan! During finals, slow down to landing approach speed Vs x 1.3 and straighten the airplane early and align and fly the runway landing heading, keep it aligned and see how much rudder and aileron cross control you are using and how much travel you have left for corrections, you know you are going to need additional travel correction when you touch down and start slowing down because you will need bigger deflections for same result as the airplaine slows down at touch down. On the straight approach if you feel you do not have enough rudder / aileron travel left for corrections, go around, find another runway with different heading more favorably to the wind direction!

Crabbing in and kicking it straight on the last second looks very cool, but leaves you open to serious misjudgment and then it is too late to correct, and an expensive oopsie might arrise.

I hope it helps, fly safe.

Kind Regards
Rudi
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Re: RV7 max crosswind component

Unread post by Technocrat » Thu Sep 20, 2018 4:13 pm

RudiGreyling wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 8:07 am
Technocrat wrote:
Tue Jul 17, 2018 4:42 pm
ACE MAN wrote:
Mon Jul 16, 2018 6:02 pm
The CAA approved manual would have been written by the builder. Generally a note of the max demonstrated crosswind is mentioned (or not) of around 12kts (My written manual that is approved does not mention that). A limit is not normal mentioned and I can tell you that the RV7/8 can handle a considerable cross wind more than that. The "stick" at RCA will demonstrate double that for you :). The aircraft limit is normally limited by the pilot - i would strongly suggest 12kts but 15 is just as easy.
Thanks Ace Man. I spoke to another Avcommer and his procedure is that when he takes off with a strong cross wind, he puts brakes ON, go to full power and then release the brakes with the idea to get as much air flow over the rudder as possible before the aircraft starts moving.

What is your modus operandi in such a scenario?

Lourens
Hi Lourens, I'll give you my 2c...don't do the brake max power crosswind take-off scenario, you looking for more trouble....

Determining max crosswind during take off is difficult, rather put the airplane away if in doubt, you are on the ground not committed to flight so wait. If you absolutely still need to take off, then bring the power slow and smoothly and accelerate smoothly, and keep the tail wheel down on the ground (to help with tail stability) as long as possible to get as much groundspeed / airspeed / airflow over the rudder for additional rudder effectiveness before lifting the tail slightly of the ground for take off.

Determining max crosswind during landing is fairly easy, you are now already committed to flight, few airports have towers to tell you the crosswind component, so you have to make a plan! During finals, slow down to landing approach speed Vs x 1.3 and straighten the airplane early and align and fly the runway landing heading, keep it aligned and see how much rudder and aileron cross control you are using and how much travel you have left for corrections, you know you are going to need additional travel correction when you touch down and start slowing down because you will need bigger deflections for same result as the airplaine slows down at touch down. On the straight approach if you feel you do not have enough rudder / aileron travel left for corrections, go around, find another runway with different heading more favorably to the wind direction!

Crabbing in and kicking it straight on the last second looks very cool, but leaves you open to serious misjudgment and then it is too late to correct, and an expensive oopsie might arrise.

I hope it helps, fly safe.

Kind Regards
Rudi
Thanks Rudi - it makes sense. Groete

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